Skin Cancer Images

RATE

Non-Cancerous Moles

Normal mole border
Normal mole symmetrical
Normal mole color
Common mole
Common mole
Normal mole border

Normal mole border

The “B” in ABCDEs for detecting melanoma refers to border. This shows a normal mole with even edges that are not ragged.
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Normal mole symmetrical

Normal mole symmetrical

The “A” in ABCDEs for detecting melanoma refers to asymmetry. This shows a normal symmetrical mole.
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Normal mole color

Normal mole color

The “C” in ABCDEs for detecting melanoma refers to color. This shows a normal coloring (no variation in shades of brown, black, red).
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Common mole

Common mole

A common mole (nevus) occurs when pigment cells (melanocytes) grow in clusters on the skin. People who have more than 50 common moles have a higher risk of developing melanoma.
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Common mole

Common mole

A common mole (nevus) occurs when pigment cells (melanocytes) grow in clusters on the skin. People who have more than 50 common moles have a higher risk of developing melanoma.
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Basal Cell Carcinoma

Basal Cell Carcinoma
Nodular Basal Cell Carcinoma
Superficial Basal Cell Carcinoma
Ulcerated Basal Cell Carcinoma
Basal Cell Carcinoma
Basal Cell Carcinoma

Basal cell carcinoma

Basal cell carcinoma (BCC) is the most common type of skin cancer — and the most common cancer overall. BCC develops in the top layer of skin, called the epidermis. BCC is most likely to develop on body parts that get the most exposure to sun: the head, the neck, and especially the nose.
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Nodular Basal Cell Carcinoma

Nodular BCC

Nodular BCC looks like a dome-shaped bump. It may be pearly or shiny. Typical colors are pink, red, brown, or black. You may see tiny blood vessels in the lesion.
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Superficial Basal Cell Carcinoma

Superficial BCC

Superficial BCC looks like a scaly pink or red plaque. You may see a raised, pearly white border. The lesion may ooze or become crusty. Superficial BCC is typically found on the chest, back, arms, and legs.
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Ulcerated Basal Cell Carcinoma

Ulcerated BCC

Over time, the top layer skin may begin to break down. This is called ulceration. Ulceration causes the center of the lesion to collapse.
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Basal cell carcinoma

Basal cell carcinoma

BCC that shows as a reddish papule (small raised pimple or swelling) can be “pearly” in color.
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Squamous Cell Carcinoma

Squamous cell carcinoma
Squamous cell carcinoma on leg
Squamous cell carcinoma on nose
Squamous cell carcinoma

Squamous cell carcinoma

Squamous cell carcinoma (SCC) develops in the flat cells that make up the outermost layer of skin. It is a non-melanoma skin cancer and is less common than basal cell carcinoma (BCC), the other major type of non-melanoma skin cancer.
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Squamous cell carcinoma on leg

Squamous cell carcinoma on leg

SCC has many different appearances because there are different forms of this cancer. SCC often looks like a rough, scaly red or brown patch.
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Squamous cell carcinoma on nose

Squamous cell carcinoma on nose

SCC often looks like a rough, scaly red or brown patch. It may be thick or crusty. SCC may develop as a raised growth or lump; some look like they have collapsed in the center. SCC may also appear to be an open sore that bleeds easily and does not heal.
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Melanoma

Advanced Malignant Melanoma
Asymmetrical Melanoma
Dysplastic nevus evolving to melanoma
Melanoma Color Difference
Melanoma Diameter Change
Advanced Malignant Melanoma

Advanced malignant melanoma

To the left, the superficial spreading of the original nodule on the right shows the beginning of melanoma that is spreading, or advanced.
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Asymmetrical Melanoma

Asymmetrical melanoma

The “A” in ABCDEs for detecting melanoma refers to asymmetry. This lesion is thinner on the right side compared to the left.
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Dysplastic nevus evolving to melanoma

Dysplastic nevus evolving to melanoma

The “E” in ABCDEs for detecting melanoma refers to evolution. This melanoma shows a change in the mole that was originally diagnosed as dysplactic nevi (atypical noncancerous moles).
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Melanoma  Color Difference

Melanoma color difference

The “C” in ABCDEs for detecting melanoma refers to color. This melanoma shows different shades of brown, black, or tan.
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Melanoma Diameter Change

Melanoma diameter change

The “D” in ABCDEs for detecing melanoma refers to diameter. This melanoma shows a change in size.
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Melanoma uneven border
Melanoma
Melanoma uneven border, brown lesion
Melanoma on foot
Melanoma red and brown lesion
Melanoma uneven border

Melanoma uneven border

The “B” in ABCDEs for detecting melanoma refers to border. This melanoma shows a border that is uneven or ragged.
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Melanoma

Melanoma

Melanoma is a type of cancer that develops from melanocytes, the cells that give skin a tan or brown color. There are about 87,000 cases of melanoma each year.
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Melanoma uneven border, brown lesion

Melanoma uneven border, brown lesion

This melanoma shows asymmetry, border irregularity, color variation, and large diameter (ABCDEs).
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Melanoma on foot

Melanoma on foot

On the palms and soles, melanoma may look like a dark bruise with an irregular border and mix of colors.
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Melanoma red and brown lesion

Melanoma red and brown lesion

This melanoma shows asymmetry, border irregularity, color variation, and large diameter (ABCDEs).
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Malignant melanoma
Malignant melanoma with halo
Metastatic melanoma
Malignant melanoma

Malignant melanoma

Malignant (cancerous) melanoma shows asymmetry, irregular border, and red, brown, and black color variation (ABCDEs).
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Malignant melanoma with halo

Malignant melanoma with halo

Malignant (cancerous) melanoma shows halo effect (depigmentation) around the small raised bump. Halo effects can also be seen surrounding a noncancerous mole.
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Metastatic melanoma

Metastatic melanoma

Once melanoma has grown into the dermis (skin), it can enter the lymph vessels and spread to other parts of the body.
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Merkel Cell Carcinoma

Merkel cell carcinoma
Merkel cell carcinoma

Merkel cell carcinoma

MCC usually is a painless red or purplish dome-shaped lump. Sometimes, the lesion is pink, blue, or the color of normal skin.
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Kaposi Sarcoma

Kaposi's sarcoma
Kaposi's sarcoma before Interferon treatment
Kaposi's sarcoma after Interferon treatment
Kaposi's sarcoma in mouth
Kaposi's sarcoma on arm
Kaposi's sarcoma

Kaposi sarcoma

KS lesions may be flat (patches or macules), raised (plaques or papules), or bumpy (nodules). They are usually red, purple, or brown. Early on, these lesions are typically painless. However, they may develop painful sores (ulceration).
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Kaposi's sarcoma before Interferon treatment

Kaposi sarcoma before Interferon treatment

KS before Interferon treatment, which is a type of immunotherapy.
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Kaposi's sarcoma after Interferon treatment

Kaposi sarcoma after Interferon treatment

KS after Interferon treatment, which is a type of immunotherapy.
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Kaposi's sarcoma in mouth

Kaposi sarcoma in mouth

A virus called “Kaposi sarcoma associated herpesvirus” (abbreviated: KSHV) causes KS. Not everyone infected with KSHV develops KS. Tumors can appear on the skin, mouth, and internal organs. These tumors are called lesions.
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Kaposi's sarcoma on arm

Kaposi sarcoma on arm

A virus called “Kaposi sarcoma associated herpesvirus” (abbreviated: KSHV) causes KS. Not everyone infected with KSHV develops KS. Tumors can appear on the skin, mouth, and internal organs. These tumors are called lesions.
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Mohs Surgery

Mohs surgery
Mohs surgery

Mohs surgery

Mohs surgery removes the skin cancer one layer at a time until there are no more layers with the cancer cells.
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view references
  1. National Cancer Institute https://visualsonline.cancer.gov/
  2. Open Access Biomedical Image Search Engine https://openi.nlm.nih.gov/index.php
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View Written By | Review Date
Last reviewed: June 2017.
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