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What’s next for squamous cell on my nose?

What’s next? I have squamous cell carcinoma on my nose, nervous and anxious. What are they gonna do to me?


Community Answers
  • Nina M moderator
    3 weeks ago

    Sharing the many, many comments we’ve seen from the community. They demonstrate the range of experience when it comes to surgery on the nose. The responses cover both squamous cell and basal cell:

    “I had Mohs done on a very small spot on side of nose right by eye. They had to put me to sleep and did a flap on forehead. Also had Mohs on lip. It went about 2 inches outside of mouth and about an inch in mouth. Great results. Almost unnoticeable.” – Joy

    “All together I’ve had 12 basal-cell surgeries. My first one was on my lip at 29 years old and I didn’t know what it was so by the time I had it diagnosed it was really bad. It seems like every few years I find one. So I’m pretty scarred up but I’m alive. I have anxiety very bad from all the surgeries. Just had one removed from the bridge of my nose last Tuesday but this one I caught early and immediately went to my doctor I had Mohs surgery they got it on the first try. Now I hope I can get a break for a little while as the older I get the more anxiety I have. I have heard in the past that if you’re going to have skin cancer basal cell is the best one so to speak because it does not metastasize but it can if it is close to any of your organs.” – Kathy

    “I had mohs surgery on my nose for basil cancer.Had spot on top of my nostril, had that one done about 6 weeks ago. The worst part for me was the shots to numb it. And wearing a bandage on it for a month. Still have one on top of my nose to do in few weeks. Overall it’s not so bad.” – Pam

    “Find a too notch Doc that does MOHs procedure. Once you know you are prone to any skin cancers, be ever vigilant! I have alerted my dermatologist to each of my melanomas, several squamous cell and basil cell. You know your body. If something seems different, get it checked out. Use your sunblocks hats and protective clothing.” – Mary

  • April Pulliam moderator
    2 years ago

    I am so sorry to hear you are dealing with squamous carcinoma. It’s completely normal to be anxious about any upcoming procedure, but you have come to the right place for support. Typically, squamous cell carcinoma is treated by removing the cancerous cells via surgery. Mohs is one of the most common surgeries for basal and squamous cell skin cancers. Mohs surgery is usually completed in a doctor’s office or in an outpatient facility. The surgeon will remove a small portion of tissue at a time and test each one. This will continue until all of the cancerous tissue has been removed and the margins are clear. Stitches and after-care instructions follow the procedure. In some cases, depending upon the placement of the stitches, a plastic surgeon may be brought in to close the wound to minimize scarring. Best of luck with your recovery or treatment. You can find further information on squamous cell treatment here: https://skincancer.net/treatment/treating-squamous-cell-carcinoma/

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